Wolfes Neck Woods State Park – Freeport, ME

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A College of Magics – Caroline Stevermer

684c34b40dca712597a456d5a77434f414f4141Faris is the Duchess of Galazon, but until she reaches her majority, her uncle’s in charge, and he’s shipped her off to Greenlaw College. Faris wants nothing to do with this choice, but it turns out, her mother has specified Greenlaw in her will, because Greenlaw teaches magic.

This story isn’t all about the college –Faris is not actually meant to practice the magic of Greenlaw – she’s meant for something much bigger, and that will bring her back to Galazon, and the neighboring kingdom of Aravill.

This book was not what I expected – it’s much more than just a school story, and Faris does not follow the typical path of plucky girl hero, and this is truly a stand alone book. It was a very interesting read – I’d love to run into more of these.

The Furthest Station – Ben Aaronovitch

3c088924915a27c596f784f7041434f414f4141Ghosts are starting to interact with passengers on the Tube, and Peter Grant (and the Folly) are called in on the case.

One complaint about this story – it’s too short. I absolutely want more of the main story line of this series, and this was not the novella to do that. That said, you get to met a baby river god, and Peter’s cousin Abigail’s studies in magic are coming along quite nicely, so it’ll be interesting to see where that goes. I just hope I get to see where that goes soon.

Garden Notes

It’s been warm so far this October.   Like, I’m currently wearing shorts, and had dinner outside last night warm.    So things are still growing better than they really should be.

Last weekend, I pulled out one of the two cherry tomatoes in the side garden – the Sweet 100’s had succumbed to blight.    The Sun Golds are still doing so well that you wouldn’t know there was only one plant in the two cages, at first glance.

I also pulled out the ground cherries – they were definitely done.     I don’t think I’d grow those again.   The whole “wait for them to drop and then you still might need to wait for them to ripen, and you really need them to be ripe or they’re poisonous” aspect is a little bit too much work for the outcome.     I’d rather grow something like strawberries that I can eat off the plant because I can really tell they’re ripe.

In the community garden plot, I pulled out the zucchini yesterday.    It was still producing blossoms, but the bees just aren’t around very much anymore, so there was no pollination happening.    (And it was pretty mildewy at this point anyway.)    I also pulled out the purple passion tomato – it was looking the worse for the wear.    The other two, though a little mildewy, do have some fruit, and they’re still ripening.     I have to clear the garden by 11/1, so we’ll just see how long I can still get ripening fruit before then.    Amazingly, the peppers and eggplant and still chugging along nicely.

The greens and herbs (other than the basil and dill at the community garden) are still doing great.    The collards I planted from seed on a whim are doing wonderfully.     We’ll probably keep those at the house next year – they’ve become BF’s favorite green.